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Education 3.0

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Invisible Learning in Buenos Aires

I recently gave the opening keynote at the Telefónica Foundation’s VII Encuentro Internacional de Educación 2012-2013 in Buenos Aires, which has taken on relationships between education, society, and work as its first theme. I shared my thoughts on Knowmad Society as it relates to the Invisible Learning paradigm. Telefónica filmed the talk, and is graciously sharing it on YouTube (note: with Spanish voice-over).

Spanish and Portugese speakers will enjoy the ongoing conversation at the Telefónica Foundation’s social network: http://encuentro.educared.org/

2009: The year of educating in Society 3.0

Throughout 2009, Education Futures experienced a 17.11% increase in readers, hailing from 183 countries around the world. Thank you!

The Society 3.0 series proved to be very popular, accounting for the majority of visits. Here are the top five articles of 2009, listed in descending order of page views:

5. Singularity University: February 2, 2009
4. The role of schools in Education 3.0: April 20, 2009
3. The role of technology in Education 3.0: April 21, 2009
2. Designing Education 3.0: April 19, 2009
1. The role of teachers in Education 3.0: May 10, 2009

Moreover, the post from last year that started it all, Moving beyond Education 2.0, remains the most popular post, overall, at Education Futures.

What started from a simple idea sketched out onto a table turned into a great series. Thank you for your continued readership, collaboration and sharing!

November agenda: Boundless conversations

The month of November promises to be a remarkable series of boundless conversations on the intersections of creativity, technology and innovation in education.

First and foremost, I owe many thanks to Fons van der Berg for organizing Education Futures NL at the Creative Learning Lab in Amsterdam, November 2. The event will feature talks by me and Cristóbal Cobo, with additional activities facilitated by Fons. The Knowmads will also pay us a visit. Central to our conversations is the question: How shall we create new educational contexts that are relevant to Society 3.0?

I will then travel to the i+i Conference in Lunteren (Netherlands) on November 4. This technology-oriented group is interested in the technological, social and philosophical opportunities afforded by computing “in the clouds.” The focus of my keynote: ICT professionals are among the first to notice how accelerating technological change is driving dramatic transformations in society and how we work -but, what about the classroom? Are schools lagging behind in providing meaningful teaching and learning for the 21st century? Unfortunately, in most places, the answer is “yes.” This talk focuses on the evolving needs of society and the economy, and the failure of education to address them. I will present a roadmap to the changes required of education, and open a discussion on “what’s required next” as technology-enabled innovators reinvent Education 3.0.

Later that evening, I will join up with Fons for TeachMeet NL 09, where they say, “the best technologies for learning are conversations and beer.” I can’t wait!

Tom Elko will report from the premiere meeting of the WISE Forum to be held in Doha on November 16 – 18, 2009. The Forum will draw leaders and decision-makers from governments, businesses, civil society, schools & universities, international institutions, NGOs, grassroots movements, top-tier media, multimedia, art and other creative communities around the globe. The event is bringing in an impressive list of speakers, including Gerhard Schröder and Biz Stone (Twitter). Of particular note to educational innovators, Curriki will accept one of the first WISE Awards for innovation in education.

Finally, I head to Helsinki on November 20 for a visit with a seminar at Haaga-Helia University of Applied Science on Boundless Learning. With both virtual and in-person components, the seminar is developing into a real treat to participate in. For a sample of the ideas we will explore, view the videos posted on the Boundless Learning blog.

More soon… stay tuned!

Ahhh, summer

Again, Education Futures joins millions of educators and policy leaders around the world in taking a little time off this summer. We are not going to completely disappear, but we will have a reduced publishing schedule. When we fire up again in August, expect a few more enhancements, including an interview series with big thinkers on the future of education.

A couple highlights from around the Web:

If there is anybody you would like to see interviewed by Education Futures, please drop us a note, and we’ll follow-up!

Thank you, Europe!

I just returned from my talks at the Creative Company Conference, ITSMF Academy, and the University of Oxford. The themes of each presentation were different, but I was able to work from a common subset of slides that built from ideas shared in the Designing Education 3.0 series at Education Futures:

Special thanks and greetings go to Rudolf van Wezel, Jamila Ross, Linda van der Heijden, Corrine Nederlof (@nederlof), Fons van der Berg (@helikon), Jeroen Bottema (@jeroenbottema), @roscamabbing, Donna Schaap (@SoyDonna), Ralf Beuker (@iterations), Arne van Oosterom (@designthinkers), Sir Ken Robinson (@SirKenRobinson), the Kaos Pilots, Amnon Levav, Michael Krömer, J. Roos, Agnes Hadderingh, Bert van Lamoen, Dan Sutch, Cristóbal Cobo, Ken Mayhew… and the many others I met and worked with over the past week!

The role of teachers in Education 3.0

Note: This article is a part of the Designing Education 3.0 series at Education Futures.

The debate continues: What is the role of a teacher? The sage on the stage or a guide on the side? In a recent Tegenlicht episode, Frank Furedi argued for a return to “classical,” power-based, download-style (banking) pedagogies. I countered that we need something different. Here’s my take:

Download-style education fails when we try to provide students with knowledge and skills that will enable them to lead in a future that is very different from what exists today –and, in a future that defies human imagination. Teaching facts or knowledge that was relevant in the past may not be acceptable today or in the near future. Moreover, if teachers are as unprepared for the future as students, why not learn invent it together?

Teaching in Education 3.0 requires a new form of co-constructivism that provides meaningful extensions to Dewey, Vygotsky and Freire, while building the future. Specifically, teaching in Education 3.0 necessitates a Leapfrog approach with:

  • Adults who are eager to imagine, create and innovate with kids
  • Kids and adults who want to learn more about each other
  • Kids and adults who partner to collaborate in teaching to and learning from each other
  • Kids who work at creative tasks that mirror the innovation workforce
  • An understanding that kids need to contribute to all economic levels, and with better distribution of effort than in the past

This will all require new forms of educational professionalism, tapping well beyond traditional teachers, and blending together with the communities that schools serve. The future that kids and adults co-create can provide the emerging knowledge/innovation economy a boost, greatly enhancing human capital and potentials. How would you teach, learn, and create in Education 3.0?

The role of technology in Education 3.0

Note: This article is a part of the Designing Education 3.0 series at Education Futures.

Little evidence suggests that new technologies in the classroom are being used to transform educational paradigms. At last year’s ASOMEX technology conference, ISTE‘s Don Knezek pointed out that student graduation rates — and their rates of interest in schools — have dropped over the past few decades.  At the same time, investments in educational information and communications technologies continue to expand. If technologies are not making an impact in the classroom today, should they power Education 3.0?

Yes, but we need to use technologies differently.  Moreover,

The problem is that Society 1.0 schools most often use technologies to teach old information rather than taking advantage of them to generate new knowledge.The use of technologies must be purposive and expand to the realm of adopting social technologies in schools. To harness the potential of open, socio-technological systems, 3.0 schools will need to rebuild themselves not on software, not on hardware, but on mindware. Such new technologies integrate the development of imagination, creativity and innovation –all critical in the 21st century workplace.  Mindware maximizes the potentials for human capital development that ambient awareness technologies permit.

Is your school investing in mindware technologies?